Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens

Last summer, when we went to Florida to visit friends, they took us to the Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens in Port Orange.  Knowing that we enjoy walking in nature, this was a wonderful way to spend an afternoon.  While I work on secret sewing projects, and it is bitterly cold outside, I thought it would be nice to take a look at this garden delight.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

It was warm on this day last summer, but there was plenty of shade along the gravel trails through the park.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

A small Japanese garden with a jinriki, a man made object, as a means to mark a place to stop and observe.  I did a post on Japanese gardens last year as part of my Japanese Inspired February event, Karesansui teien.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

This is a native Florida wildflower called a Meadowbeauty, also called Spiderwort in other areas of the country.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

This pretty red flower is a bush honeysuckle.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Yellow milkweed shines in the sun.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Purple heliotrope blooms are lovely, even with only about half of them open.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

In the park was a human sundial.  This was fun to see.  You stand between the stones for the months, next to the current month, and your shadow will point to the time.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Through the trees, the sugar mill was hidden from the main path.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Established in 1830, it only produced sugar sporadically due to fluctuations in the market and difficulties with weather.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

It was burned by the Seminoles in during the Seminole War in 1835, and the wooden parts were destroyed. It was rebuilt in the 1840s, but never really was a consistent producer of sugar.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

During the Civil War, the mill was appropriated by the confederacy to make salt.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Much of the stonework and metal vats were still there, although badly damaged by weather and age.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Just around the next bend from the sugar mill, this huge oak with its enormous canopy of branches is called the Confederate Oak.  According to legends, Confederate soldiers would camp underneath it.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Even the bromeliad growing on one of the branches was huge.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

Lovely shade, and draping Spanish moss give a sense of stately splendor, and advanced age.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

More trails led past small gardens and little creeks with charming bridges.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

On the way out, I spotted these deep red bromeliad flowers.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

The deep red color was stunning.

Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens at FromMyCarolinaHome

I hope you enjoyed a walk in a summer garden, in the deep of winter for those of us in the northern hemisphere.  I am working on projects for you, and all will be revealed soon.  The next teacup block is coming on Friday, an update to the quilt project soon, and the start of a mystery quilt along is coming.

Have you visited someplace special recently?

Sharing – Take Me Away!

17 thoughts on “Dunlawton Sugar Mill Gardens

  1. What a stunning paradise walk! thank you for sharing these pictures with uw. they are especially welcome on this cold, windy, gray day here. We’re expecting frigid temps overnight…O Spring Where Art Thou?? Good days to stay hunkered down and sew up a storm hugs, Julierose

  2. Sue Ann Boitnott

    This is the perfect blog post to wake up to when the temperature in Michigan is bitter cold and the snow is still coming down. What a blessings.

  3. I really enjoyed your FL photos this morning. It was one of those “I wish I was there” comments because when I got up at 4:30 this morning it was -34 outside so I’ll just have to enjoy your walk on computer.

  4. Lisa Knight

    Thanks for the visit! I love interesting, some times forgotten places that show bits of our history. Nothing like seeing and experiencing them to make you appreciate them. Nature can be so relaxing if we let it be!

  5. What a beautiful place! Thanks for the virtual visit! When we were in Myrtle Beach in 2017, we enjoyed walking through Brookgreen Gardens. It’s near Murrell’s Inlet. Have you ever gone there? It is on the site of some former rice plantations, but is now a botanic garden and sculpture park.

  6. Mary Crawford

    Thank you for sharing a lovely look at what we hope will be in the day’s ahead. The spiderwort was lovely. I have many but have not taken the time to photograph them so close. In fact, many will be pulled out this summer.
    At present, no special visits to anywhere but my sofa and today a doctor’s appointment. I’ve been trying to recuperate from a bad cough and the weather decided to break all records again here in Minnesota. SO….the car will be heating up for quite a while before venturing out. It could be worse….we have power and no blizzards. Predictions for about a 50 degree change in warmth this weekend. Yea for us!

  7. Brenda Ackerman

    Hello Carole, The gardens and special places that you share with us are appreciated by me. Although my memory forgets the majority of history in the US alone, I appreciate hearing about it and seeing special aspects of it also. Plus, you also know of my love for the florals and all other aspects of nature that bring so much beauty and delight to our world. I had a fabulous walk today and enjoyed it very much. Thank you for thinking of us and sharing it on this cold day. Have a marvelous day!

  8. Beautiful gardens, and I do so enjoy gardens. I was surprised at the Bromeliad growing on the branch in that tree–it’s HUGE! It reminded me of the Staghorn ferns that my mother used to grow. She loved those things and I thought they weren’t all that great. I love plants that bloom. Thanks for sharing!

  9. Thank you for the stroll through the lovely garden. It certainly makes me feel warm this morning, even though it is 0* here in NH. Your photos are great! I enjoyed the look at the historical setting, too. We enjoy finding venues like this when we travel because there are interesting stories behind the ruins.

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