The Raulston Arboretum, Part 2

Returning to the JC Raulston Arboretum, there is so much more to see.  Day lilies are prevalent in NC, and they had a number of beautiful specimens in bloom in August.  My home garden day lilies are earlier bloomers.  At least the ones I have left, LOL, after digging up a bunch and giving them away.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

This gorgeous orange is a canna.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

One of the main purposes of this arboretum is to be a research facility for plants for the state.  There are many beds of flowers being grown specifically for sale.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

Beds of different varieties of the same genus of plant are growing alongside each other.  In the distance, you can see the research greenhouses which were not open to the public.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

Another section had masses of color in beds surrounded by grass paths.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

I was captivated by the number of varieties and different colors on the ornamental peppers.  There was an entire section of the gardens devoted to research on the best varieties to grow.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

Bright purple and orange above were planted near the deep red and almost black ones below.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

This variety with the purple leaves was striking with its bright red peppers.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

I really never thought about what goes into choosing a variety of impatiens to grow for any particular area.  But, these were being tested as a new variety to be sold.  Someday, this variety may end up at local garden centers.  Many plant wholesalers use the program at the arboretum for testing their new varieties of flowers and vegetables.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

In another area, about 20 different varieties of begonia were being tested, every one of them a similar color of coral.  You can read more about this part of the garden with their Trial Reports, a virtual gold mine of information for the garden researcher.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

It wouldn’t be a complete research garden without tomatoes!

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

Passion flowers are amazing in form and color.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

The Rooftop Garden is placed on the roof of the Education center, to not only study heat tolerant plants, but to assess the impact on the building’s insulation and reduction in radiated heat into the environment.  The plaque describes the multiple layers of soil, filters and drainage on the roof.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

It was definitely warmer there, with radiated heat from the pavers on this hot August day.  The arbor provided visual interest, but no real shade.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

While cactus is not a plant I like, I had to admire this pretty flower on one.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

I don’t remember what these yellow ones were, but they did well in the heat.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

From the rooftop garden, a view of the pathways leading to the Asian Valley can be seen.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

On the way down, I noticed yet one more variety of butterfly.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

I didn’t know that many of the plants we consider native were actually imported originally from the Asian continent.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

The pretty pavers and tiles mark the Asian gardens, with a lot of foliage in August.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

The tiled pathway lead to a more shaded part of the Asian Valley exhibit where more foliage plants were growing.  There were some flowers here too.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

This pretty hibiscus was stunning in color.

NC Raulston Arboretum at FromMyCarolinaHome.com

All total, I spent several hours walking and taking pictures in this wonderful arboretum.  If you find yourself in Raleigh, NC, it is worth the trip, and admission is free.  If you missed the first part of this two-part post, click on Raulston Arborteum Part 1.

Do you like to walk in gardens?

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10 thoughts on “The Raulston Arboretum, Part 2

  1. We love to find gardens, public or private, to explore when we travel. It is a nice relief from all the concrete of the big cities. Thank you for the stroll through the arboretum this morning, when it is 9* here in NH!

  2. Sylvia E Anderson

    Good morning Carole….Thank you so much for sharing your photos of these beautiful gardens. The passion flower is so lovely with it’s spidey center and glorious color, and the yellow cactus is also a beautiful eye-catching bloom. It sounds like an amazing place to visit, what with all the different areas, such as the roof garden and research gardens along with free admission. I don’t think there is anything like it near Chicago, and it certainly would not be free, if there was. What we do have, that I know you would thoroughly enjoy, are the Anderson Japanese Gardens, which we have visited, and thoroughly enjoyed. It’s been rated one of the highest quality Japanese Gardens in North America and have a website with some beautiful pictures and information. One would normally not equate the name Anderson with a Japanese Garden, would they?

  3. Hi Carole! I think the yellow flower is coreopsis or sometimes called tickseed. I have some in my flower beds up here in zone 5, and I do believe the butterflies enjoy it. There is also a light pink version that isn’t quite as hardy, but I keep trying to get it to thrive. ~smile~ Roseanne

  4. As we are awaiting our snowstorm, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the walk through the arboretum
    with you….
    right now 25 degrees but temps are supposed to plunge tonight..another 2″-3″ due–not too bad…
    we’ve not had any really big snow events so far this year–just damp cold winds…
    So looking forward to Spring…hugs, Julierose

  5. Phyllis Smith

    Good morning,

    A fond memory for me this morning. The Canna Lily is a large group of them growing in Grand-ma”s back yard and my FIRST look at a hummingbird as a young chold about 5 or 6 years old. I was fascinated that it could hover and fly sideways and backwards and it was so beautiful in color. Lovely memory.

    Phyllis

  6. What a lovely place! You know, my mom has some artwork of Passion flowers, and all these years, I thought they were a fake, or stylized flower. Only recently have I seen photos of them and realized that such a wonderful flower actually exists! I haven’t seen one in person though!

  7. Felicia Hamlin

    Yes, the Passion flowers are gorgeous and that shade of red on the hibiscus is outstanding! I love flowerss. I don’t think the yellow flowers are Tickseed, I believe they are a type of daisy, the Tickseed has a lacy foliage. Thanks for sharing your photos, Carole.

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